The Sbyt (Sebayit) of Onitaset Kumat

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Conversations with an African Blood Siblings Sba (Wisdom Teacher)

thesunatmidnight2:

Fredrick Douglass (1818-1895), a fugitive slave who became the best-known black abolitionist orator and autobiographer, and Herman Melville (1819-1891), a fiction writer recognized for the elusiveness of his meanings, both composed stories about slave revolts at sea. In the decade just before the Civil War, during years of increasingly angry debate about slavery, Douglass in “The Heroic Slave” (1853) and Melville in “Benito Cereno” (1855) fictionalized important slave insurrections. Of the mutiny on the Creole, on which Douglass’s story is based, the editors recount what can be recovered about the slave Madison Washington, who led the revolt, and reconstruct the events before and after the uprising. The editors warn the readers that the official documents about the case are all biased against the mutineers, who were never allowed to tell their story to American officials. Addressing largely white readers in the North, Douglass, to the contrary, speaks clearly as an abolitionist: Slaves wanted their freedom and were justified in using violence to gain it. "Benito Cereno" is based on Captain Amasa Delano’s chapter in his Narrative of Voyages and Travels… (1817) about a slave mutiny off the coast of South America. Writing in part for a northern readership, Melville tells of a mutiny that, unlike Madison Washington’s, was suppressed. Delano’s account shows no sympathy for the slaves. Melville’s view is hidden in ambiguities. "Benito Cereno" is one of Melville’s stories most often collected in anthologies; Douglas’s "The Heroic Slave" is rarely reprinted.

thesunatmidnight2:

Fredrick Douglass (1818-1895), a fugitive slave who became the best-known black abolitionist orator and autobiographer, and Herman Melville (1819-1891), a fiction writer recognized for the elusiveness of his meanings, both composed stories about slave revolts at sea. In the decade just before the Civil War, during years of increasingly angry debate about slavery, Douglass in “The Heroic Slave” (1853) and Melville in “Benito Cereno” (1855) fictionalized important slave insurrections. 
Of the mutiny on the Creole, on which Douglass’s story is based, the editors recount what can be recovered about the slave Madison Washington, who led the revolt, and reconstruct the events before and after the uprising. The editors warn the readers that the official documents about the case are all biased against the mutineers, who were never allowed to tell their story to American officials. Addressing largely white readers in the North, Douglass, to the contrary, speaks clearly as an abolitionist: Slaves wanted their freedom and were justified in using violence to gain it. 
"Benito Cereno" is based on Captain Amasa Delano’s chapter in his Narrative of Voyages and Travels… (1817) about a slave mutiny off the coast of South America. Writing in part for a northern readership, Melville tells of a mutiny that, unlike Madison Washington’s, was suppressed. Delano’s account shows no sympathy for the slaves. Melville’s view is hidden in ambiguities. "Benito Cereno" is one of Melville’s stories most often collected in anthologies; Douglas’s "The Heroic Slave" is rarely reprinted.

— 1 day ago with 3 notes
"Young men, to the front!" by Hon. Richard T. Greener, LL.D.

“Young men, to the front!” by Hon. Richard T. Greener, LL.D.

In the Service of our Ancestors and African Love,
Listen Seeker, I come in peace,

“Vata dikôndo mbôngi diafwa.” (A village without a boko [Community Center] is dead. A society without institutions where public freedom is warranted is straight to its fall.) — African Proverb

In 1914 Robert John Nelson and Alice-Moore Dunbar collaborated on “Master Pieces of Negro Eloquence” and among the excerpts…

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— 5 days ago with 1 note
#African Youth  #Richard T. Greener 

Family, you are not going to believe this… I just found out that ANOTHER beautiful, young and intelligent Sista who inspired black girls and black women to love their natural selves, also died yesterday.  There is no such thing as coincidence. Something is going on.  Below is a video of the late Dominque Banks.”
— 1 week ago with 3 notes
Fable: The Gender Battle

Fable: The Gender Battle

In the Service of our Ancestors and African Love,
Listen Seeker, I come in peace,

“The virtue of the soldiers is worth more than a multitude, and the site is often of more benefit than virtue.” — General Rule of Warfare

In warfare the strategy depends on the multitude, the soldiers and the site.  The site is most important.  Today, the site Africans face is being surrounded on all four sides.  In…

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— 1 week ago with 9 notes
#African Gender  #Black Gender  #Gender Battle  #Gender War 
Anonymous asked: what do you think can make black poeple unify? What can we all do as individuals to make sure it happens?


Answer:

"Unity presupposes organization." — Kwame Nkrumah

We need to join Organizations which are founded on Universal Law.  As an individual, join Brotherhoods and Sisterhoods which are about Community and Family Control.

— 1 week ago with 7 notes
"Oni, the Chinese are EVERYWHERE. My buddy just called me after he came up from JA and told me Kingston is swarming with them. Restaurants, spice shops, even the beaches are now privatized and guess what? Blacks ain’t invited in their own land."
truthbetold, emailing me after I wrote, “Too many of us don’t mind not controlling our nation.  So others step to the plate.

If we don’t want to define Black on a national level, the Chinese will happily jump into the category while we sleep.  First South Africa then the rest?”
— 1 week ago with 36 notes
"Remembering a time when African Queens ruled" by Robin Walker

“Remembering a time when African Queens ruled” by Robin Walker

In the Service of our Ancestors and African Love,
Listen Seeker, I come in peace,

“Each truth you learn will be, for you, as new as if it had never been written.” — African Proverb

The truth is out there.  It is often written.  It’s upon us to research the writings of our past.  There was a time when Africans ruled and Kings and Queens ruled.  The time passed.  Interracial Warfare took that time…

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— 2 weeks ago with 17 notes
#African Family  #African Kings  #African Power  #African Queens  #Ancient Kemet  #Ancient KMT  #Wafrika 
"

Acting alone, Claudette Colvin mustered enough courage to defy the segregation laws of Alabama. She could have easily been raped, lynched or both. She had faith in Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth who, she said, directed her to take this “direct action”. She was a teenager and her action preceded the well-publicized arrest, nine months later, of Rosa Parks.

If a teenager, acting alone, can have a “leap of faith”, it is not too much to ask grown men from thirty NBA teams to boycott the “NBA Finals” if the Miami Heat hosts it. Otherwise, they could initiate a general strike. Maat requires it. Currently, there is no demand on the bargaining table against Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law. Some Blacks prefer an empty table. They also offer no counter proposals.

"
Alton H. Maddox, Jr.
— 2 weeks ago with 4 notes
"The headline of this week’s New York Amsterdam News should read, “More Blacks Watched Knicks-Nets Duel than Listened to Claudette Colvin”. In fact, there were far more paid customers at Madison Square Garden than at a free event at the Brooklyn Christian Center on this past Wednesday evening. We prefer to feed our hearts rather than our minds."
Alton H. Maddox, Jr.
— 2 weeks ago with 1 note
Anonymous asked: Do you think you can identify as a Black Nationalist while dating interracially? I am a Black man who is very interested in embracing the movement/ideology but at the same time I am very attracted to white women and would definitely be interested in dating one.


Answer:

blackpeopleconfessions:

Research would benefit you if you are seriously considering calling yourself a Black Nationalist. But to give you the answer straight up, no. The inherent definition of Black Nationalism clashes with interracial dating. Modern day Black Nationalists might have different opinions on the matter, but in terms of traditional Black Nationalism, to call yourself a Black Nationalist while dating a non-Black person is a contradiction.

- Admin C

— 3 weeks ago with 19 notes
African Company Mi-Fone Beats Apple to Release First Black Emojis
Niti Bhan - March 30, 2014 - No comments
An African company has released the world’s first set of black emojis, following complaints that different races are not represented in the current set used on mobile devices and computers worldwide. Oju Africa, a division of African mobile company Mi-Fone, launched the collection of 15 emojis this week in face of growing criticism of Apple, which introduced much of the current set to the US market.
Oju translates as “face” in the Yoruba language of Nigeria. The emojis are available now for Android (search for “oju emoticon app” in Play Store), and will be released soon for iOS.
“We follow global trends but we are differentiated by our authentic African voice. So as a brand we wanted to do something that only Africa could pull off, something that could become so iconic that it would have the world talking. I believe what we have created will ensure that every African on the planet won’t be able to help but love it!” said Creative director Eserick Fouché.
The announcement comes after a petition was launched for Apple to scrap its list of 800 emojis, of which only two appear to be non-white: “man with gua-pi-mao” and “man with turban”. The list is regulated by the Unicode Consortium to ensure consistency, and though also used across Google and Microsoft platforms, Apple has been the focus of protests as it pioneered their use, and first enabled colour emojis to be used.

http://theprepaideconomy.com/2014/03/african-company-mi-fone-beats-apple-to-release-first-black-emojis/

African Company Mi-Fone Beats Apple to Release First Black Emojis

An African company has released the world’s first set of black emojis, following complaints that different races are not represented in the current set used on mobile devices and computers worldwide. Oju Africa, a division of African mobile company Mi-Fone, launched the collection of 15 emojis this week in face of growing criticism of Apple, which introduced much of the current set to the US market.

Oju translates as “face” in the Yoruba language of Nigeria. The emojis are available now for Android (search for “oju emoticon app” in Play Store), and will be released soon for iOS.

“We follow global trends but we are differentiated by our authentic African voice. So as a brand we wanted to do something that only Africa could pull off, something that could become so iconic that it would have the world talking. I believe what we have created will ensure that every African on the planet won’t be able to help but love it!” said Creative director Eserick Fouché.

The announcement comes after a petition was launched for Apple to scrap its list of 800 emojis, of which only two appear to be non-white: “man with gua-pi-mao” and “man with turban”. The list is regulated by the Unicode Consortium to ensure consistency, and though also used across Google and Microsoft platforms, Apple has been the focus of protests as it pioneered their use, and first enabled colour emojis to be used.

http://theprepaideconomy.com/2014/03/african-company-mi-fone-beats-apple-to-release-first-black-emojis/

— 3 weeks ago with 34 notes
 Q. Why the huge audience of Black Women to a show as disgraceful as this? 

A. Truth is that Black people prefer seeing Black people more than they do White people; and we watch Television. So sure a Black woman can watch “Friends” and “Seinfeld” and not be degraded; but then she is missing out on seeing one of hers—who “made it” no less. It’s like asking why do Brothers watch BET or Hip Hop videos. We’d gladly watch Soul Train or Black Power programming but neither are on the air. Black women watch Black women on TV but White men control the airwaves. We can complain or we can build the necessary infrastructure to broadcast. So far, time after time, we choose the former. Hence why Black Women watch “Scandal.”
Q. Why the huge audience of Black Women to a show as disgraceful as this?

A. Truth is that Black people prefer seeing Black people more than they do White people; and we watch Television. So sure a Black woman can watch “Friends” and “Seinfeld” and not be degraded; but then she is missing out on seeing one of hers—who “made it” no less.

It’s like asking why do Brothers watch BET or Hip Hop videos. We’d gladly watch Soul Train or Black Power programming but neither are on the air.

Black women watch Black women on TV but White men control the airwaves. We can complain or we can build the necessary infrastructure to broadcast. So far, time after time, we choose the former. Hence why Black Women watch “Scandal.”

— 3 weeks ago with 2 notes
Anonymous asked: What do you look for in a woman?


Answer:

Is she or isn’t she my wife?

— 3 weeks ago with 1 note